Same-Sex Marriage: America Proves That “Homophobia” Does Exist

Flickr (Fibonacci Blue)

Flickr (Fibonacci Blue)

Homophobia: a very hee-hee-haa-haa term that was coined to define a fear in gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transsexuals. Could there really be such an irrational fear of an otherwise, very friendly community of individuals who are attracted to their own gender? Is it even feasible that a country can stint the progress of equality because of the idea that the LGBT may gain the same rights they do?

Apparently so. Homophobia runs just as rampant in the United States as the HIV pandemic.

I’ve written about the topic before and I can never seem to grasp as to why the LGBT must continuously fight for their rights… or their lives even. In fact, why do they even have to fight for their rights AT ALL? One topic that I’ve paid very close attention to is same-sex marriage.

Across the globe, countries have already began to show signs of tolerance. In Britain, a bill that would legalize same-sex marriage has cleared the parliament hurdle. France just recently celebrated its first gay wedding of Vincent and Bruno. And in South Africa… well, I’ll stop right there because it’s South fucking Africa and they legalized same-sex marriage before we did!

AND THEY HAD ANIMAL PRINT WEDDING ENSEMBLES.

Back at home, the legalization of same-sex marriage has slowly gained momentum with three states joining nine others and Washington D.C. Of the 13 regions that allow same-sex marriage here in the U.S., Minnesota really licked the infected wounds of Republican presidential candidates Mitt Romney and Michele Bachmann, proving that despite the people’s split-down-the-line party affiliations, equality is of utmost importance.

Yet we still move at a snail’s pace, still in the process of discussing as to whether or not Proposition 8 in California is wrong (it is) and still also in the process of discussing as to whether or not we should just obliterate the Defense of Marriage Act.

California has repeatedly become a disappointment to me and I’m still bitter that New York was first to legalize marriage for the gays. Two meccas of diverse cultures and the one who can come to terms with social maturity is the significantly smaller one. I can’t even. My heartstrings are being tugged on and I just want to eat cake.

Though in my personal space that is my blog, I’ll just go ahead and say that the country is afraid of losing the trust of its citizens by throwing out Proposition 8. I find that understandable because the majority in California voted that way despite a change in attitude toward the issue. But the thing is – the majority voted on an issue that mirrors Jim Crowe Laws. The meaning of MARRIAGE would only be defined as man and woman while same-sex couples would enter ‘domestic partnerships.’ There’s something wrong when a society thinks that your love is different than theirs. Can homophobia REALLY measure the essence of emotion like that?

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About neilprotacio

Freelance journalist who just so happens to know what goes well with certain breads.
This entry was posted in Blog, LGBT, Opinion, Politics and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Same-Sex Marriage: America Proves That “Homophobia” Does Exist

  1. A Proud New Yorker says:

    Very well-written. I applaud you, Neil.

    I do have one question, however: What does the size of the “mecca” have to do with its level of social maturity? Or rather, why are you bitter that New York was first before California? It’s a step in the right direction for everyone.

    I would’ve been happy if California was the first, doesn’t matter to me. As long as one legalizes it first, there’s still hope for the other.

    • neilprotacio says:

      Hi! Thanks for the nice comment!

      In this weird universe that I like to call my mind – and I share this thought with friends from New York actually – there’s this unspoken friendly rivalry between New York and California. There’s so many different cultures and perspectives in both these states that they almost mirror each other. It’s like a sibling rivalry. As far as the size of each mecca goes – I’d like to think that with California being the bigger state with numerous LGBT communities, we’d be able to pull together for those communities and give them the right to say, “WE’RE MARRIED!” But we still haven’t. We overturned Proposition 8 but their advocates are battling right back and taking it to Supreme Court. Think of it as me being jealous because I love California so much that I really want this state to finally realize that HEY. Gay people are just like everyone else!

      Nonetheless, I am still overjoyed that New York legalized gay marriage. No doubt it is the step in the right direction. I hope California can follow suit.

      Cheers! And thank you again for the nice comment! 🙂

  2. Nicely put. And I hope you don’t waste anymore emotions on feeling bitter that New York trumped California. We are all in this together and our spirit connects us as one, everywhere. What California did ignited New York to step up. Take pride in that. My first essay pushing for equality was published in the St. Petersburg Times 11 years ago and my latest (The Telltale Heart, WORDPRESS) has been updated from 2004. This fight isn’t over, and June is fast approaching. Every word you write that is read between now and that ruling is a call for action, now! And I thank you for it.

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